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Brisbane businessman takes just 60 minutes to buy $3m penthouse

13/12/2018 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

A Brisbane-based businessman has bought a multimillion-dollar Toowong penthouse the day he saw it, little more than a week after the apartment hit the market.
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The buyer ??? who selling agent Emil Juresic declined to name ??? owns importing and exporting companies in several countries.

“The buyer saw the place yesterday, twice,” the NGU Real Estate principal said. After visiting the property on the Wednesday morning, the buyer came back at seven o’clock that night with his family.

“I left him for one hour in the place with his family. I came back an hour later and the contract was on the table.”

Mr Juresic presented the offer of $3,075,000 to the sellers that night, even though they live on the southern tip of the Gold Coast.

“I drove all the way to Coolangatta at 11pm to finish the sale,” he said.

By midnight, the ink was dry and the offer accepted.

The relatively quick sale has left others in the property industry impressed, because prestige property in Brisbane can be notoriously difficult to move. Related: Brisbane remains a favourite for investorsRelated: Proposed new laws to make selling harder in BrisbaneRelated: Poorer suburbs can be up to 10 degrees hotter

“Having it sold in one week is really good, you don’t see that much. Especially high end properties,” Red & Co’s residential sales director Anthony Oddo said. “Sometimes they take four to six weeks and sometimes they take even longer.”

Mr Oddo suggested the sale may have been as fast because of the uniqueness of the property.

“There’s all that talk about units struggling but if you’ve got something that’s unique, it doesn’t have to be $2 million plus, it will sell and you won’t have to struggle to resell,” he said.

The penthouse at 37 Archer Street is certainly something special, featuring a huge New York-style void in above the living areas, 180 degree views of the Brisbane river from the two storey, floor-to-ceiling windows, and unbeatable city views. It also has four bedrooms, a rooftop spa, and nine car parks.

Mr Juresic put the speedy sale down to the quality of the unit and his team’s marketing strategy.

“We had a great product to sell, it’s got a great location too. It’s on the money,” he said. “I don’t want to sound arrogant but I always say this, I sold over $50 million in property in a year for one reason: my marketing strategy works.”

Maniumpathy hotel review, Colombo

13/12/2018 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

THE PLACE
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Tour operators and travel agents have until recently tended to omit Colombo from their itineraries. But not including the burgeoning Sri Lankan capital in your plans, aside from all else, would mean missing some outstanding colonial-era architecture, some of which, including the Dutch Hospital, now a tasteful restaurant and retail complex, has been restored by the army following the end of the three-decade-long civil war. Maniumpathy, by contrast, is a 19th-century mansion-cum-boutique hotel that has belonged to no fewer than five generations of the Hallock family from Jaffna in Sri Lanka’s Tamil-majority far north. THE SPACE

Guests are in the best hands at this delightful establishment, named after a town called Manipay, since it is managed by the British-owned Manor House Concepts, a collection of restored accommodation-based villas, most of which date to the 19th-century British colonial period, across the teardrop-shaped island. After such a long history, Maniumpathy only recently was transformed into a boutique hotel in a well-to-do area of Colombo. The hotel is built around a tranquil courtyard garden and pool. THE ROOM

Each of the eight rooms, of which there are four types, are named after a woman from various generations of the family. I’ve scored the 52-square-metre Annapuranie Suite, an elegant, antique-festooned ground-level room that runs directly off the garden and pool. It features a four-poster bed and a large separate bathroom. Though the room is a little dark, there is an inviting small private garden terrace running off the bedroom. Meals are served under the nearby verandah of the majestic main house but you can also opt for room service. THE FOOD

One of the pleasures of a visit to Sri Lanka is its traditional breakfasts, replete with local egg and string hoppers and curries. One of the best is served here at The Nandi, the hotel’s low-key terrace restaurant overlooking the courtyard. Elsewhere, for larger groups, there is the opportunity to dine in the Grand Ebony Room, named after Maniumpathy’s 16-seat ebony table. If you fancy heading out for lunch, don’t miss the courtyard cafe at charming Barefoot Gallery on Galle Road. It doubles as the headquarters of the renowned textiles design house with branches throughout Sri Lanka. STEPPING OUT

Despite what you may read and hear, there is much to do and enjoy in Colombo with its British, Dutch and Portuguese influences. A visit to the Galle Face Hotel, the Raffles of Colombo and one of the oldest surviving colonial-era hotels in Asia, for a drink or a bite is essential as is an evening stroll along the seafront of Galle Face Green, Colombo’s premier, and oft-crowded, public park. Elsewhere, don’t miss frenetic Pettah markets, one of the nearest India-like experiences you’ll encounter in Sri Lanka. THE VERDICT

Maniumpathy is magnificent. It’s a fine, rewarding alternative to a stay in a larger hotel and an opportunity to experience a taste of Sri Lanka’s colonial history and architecture when the British referred to the island as Ceylon. The breakfasts alone are worthy of a return visit. ESSENTIALS

Doubles from $US200, low season. 129 Kynsey Road, Colombo. Ph +94 (01) 1269 6988. Maniumpathy can be booked as part of a Classic Safari Company itinerary. See classicsafaricompany苏州夜网.au; manorhouseconcepts苏州夜网; maniumpathy苏州夜网HIGHLIGHT

A languid Sri Lankan breakfast taken under the eaves of the mansion overlooking the beautiful courtyard, gardens and pool. LOWLIGHT

The hotel is a little removed from the main action in Colombo but transport is plentiful and easily arranged.

University of Newcastle graduates’ day to shine

13/12/2018 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

University of Newcastle graduates’ day to shine | photos BIG PLANS: Law honours graduate Alex Winn (right) with Georgia Monaghan, before Mr Winn addressed fellow graduates at the University of Newcastle’s Great Hall on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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MOMENTOUS DAY: University of Newcastle graduates Billy Sun, Carrie Sun and Eva Guo pose for a selfie on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

MOMENTOUS DAY: University of Newcastle graduates Billy Sun, Carrie Sun and Eva Guo pose for a selfie on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

BIG PLANS: Law honours graduate Alex Winn before Mr Winn addressed fellow graduates at the University of Newcastle’s Great Hall on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

MILESTONE: Graduates including Alice Irungu, in red, outside the Great Hall on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

MILESTONE: Graduates outside the Great Hall on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

MILESTONE: Graduates outside the Great Hall on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

PROUD: Yan Xue at her university graduation on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

TweetFacebookIFAlex Winn could go back and offerhis younger selfadvice on starting university, the law honours graduate wouldn’t pass on a golden study tiporseize the chance toeliminatehismistakes.

Insteadthe 24-year-old from Adamstown, who was among hundreds of business and law students to graduate from the University of Newcastle on Thursday, would go back and soak up everything aboutstudent life that he could.

“I would say to get involved in things, because there’s always opportunities,” hesaid.

“And not just the study opportunities; I’d saygo to the parties, just get involved.”

At the end of six years of study for adouble degree, Mr Winn empathised with hisfellow graduates in theGreat Hall on Thursday about Newcastle student cultural artefacts such as$7 deals and the“David Attenborough”-worthy mosquitoes of Jesmond.

He also appealed to each of them to use theirprivilege for good, and to protect the rule of law from those who might tryto erode it.

“In times when those values feel increasingly under siegewe must speak up in their defence,” he said.

“For all graduates, our degrees have taught us skills in critical thinking, logic and reasoning.I hope we use them well. To confront bigotry and ignorance with rational argument. To act with kindness and compassion rather than fear.”

Mr Winn now teaches the university’s first-year law program full-time, andwill take up a position next year as a tipstaff, or associate, to a judge on the NSW Court of Appeal in Sydney.

The university’sVice-ChancellorCaroline McMillen said this year’sgraduation, which concludes on Friday, is an opportunity to reflect on the transformative impact that education can have on a student’s life.

“Graduation is a grounding and inspirational moment for not only the students and their families, but also the university.It represents the culmination of years of hard work, dedication, trials, tribulations and personal growth that cannot be measured by marks alone,” Professor McMillen said.

“It is a proud moment for the University of Newcastleto watch the next generation of talented graduates cross the stage and embark on the beginning of their remarkable careers with a world-class education behind them.”

Ten reasons to travel this stunning European river

14/08/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

SPONSORED CONTENT
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This is the good life. When you’re cruising down Portugal’s Douro River, glass of local wine in hand, stunning scenery laid out before you, you’ll have to agree. When you’re exploring the cobbled laneways of Lisbon, when you’re checking out the tapas bars of Madrid – you’ll have to agree. This is the good life.

Portugal and Spain are truly amazing travel destinations; places where life is lived to its fullest, where family, friends, good food and wine are the most important things of all. To dive into this irresistible culture is to indulge in the good life; truly, this is a journey to inspire, to fulfil, and to fall in love with. Live the Mediterranean life

All of those dreams you have of the Mediterranean lifestyle, the long lunches in the sunshine, the delicious fresh produce, the familial atmosphere, the affordable, high-quality food and wine – they will come true. Very quickly. On APT’s “Douro Delights” tour you’ll find yourself enjoying the best of the Iberian lifestyle, tasting cheese and wine at Quinta da Aveleda, eating a family-style lunch in Quinta da Roeda, and taking dinner aboard your river ship surrounded by friends old and new. Unpack once

One of the standard hassles of European travel is the constant movement, the packing and unpacking of bags, the checking in and checking out of hotels. Aboard a river cruise, however, that isn’t an issue. From day four to day 11 of this journey your hotel room will move with you, as your luxury river ship transports you up the Douro River and into some of the most beautiful locales northern Portugal has to offer. Visit two of Europe’s great cities

Lisbon.

Douro Delights’ river cruise is bookended by visits to two of Europe’s greatest, though sometimes underappreciated, capital cities: Lisbon, and Madrid. In Lisbon, ride the city’s iconic tramcars, explore its warrens of cobbled streets, and take a detour to the historic seaside town of Sintra. In Madrid, visit the famed Prado art museum, learn about Spanish cuisine on a culinary tour, or explore the Santiago Bernabeu, home of the Real Madrid football club.

Madrid.Cruise in style

APT’s Douro Valley river ship, the AmaVida, is a luxurious vessel custom-built for cruising this magnificent waterway. Seventy per cent of the staterooms feature private balconies, and there are plenty of facilities to enjoy as you make your leisurely way through northern Portugal, including an open-air swimming pool, a spa, a sun deck, a lounge and bar, and a restaurant with both indoor and alfresco dining spaces. Enjoy free time

Though the “Douro Delights” cruise has plenty of experiences included, there’s also ample time to explore on your own, to get to know the places you visit at your natural pace. Walk the cobbled lanes of Lisbon; enjoy a leisurely lunch in Sintra; wander the terraced hillsides of Pinhao; or hop between tapas bars in Madrid. This tour gives you the freedom to discover what makes this part of the world unique. Wine and dine

Enjoy the wine of the Douro Valley.

The highlight of any journey through the Iberian Peninsula is undoubtedly the food: the cuisines of Portugal and Spain are history, culture and love on a plate. On the Douro Delights tour you’ll be treated to the full splendour of Iberian gastronomy, from a private meal at the winemaking estate Quinta da Aveleda, to a picnic by the river in Regua, to the option of a culinary tour in Madrid, to the high-quality, authentic local dishes you’ll be served every day by the internationally-trained team on board the MS AmaVida. Enjoy Signature Experiences

The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Remedios in Lamego.

APT offers its guests the chance to enjoy classic parts of Portugal and Spain that few other people ever get to see through its range of “Signature Experiences”. At Quinta da Aveleda, explore stunning gardens before indulging in a wine and cheese tasting and private dinner. In the Portuguese town of Lamego, visit the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Remedies. And in Pinhao, relax with a family-style lunch at a winery. Explore the Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is one of Europe’s underappreciated gems, a waterway with looks to match the Rhine, wine-making culture to match the Loire Valley, and history to match the Rhone. Its delights are all there for you to discover on this journey, too: the ancient villages set into hillsides; the blue-and-white-tiled buildings; the terraced slopes catching the warmth of the sun; the wineries with their long lunches. It’s a seemingly never-ending joy. Step back in time

There’s some serious history in the Douro Valley: not only is this the oldest demarcated wine region in the world, but there have been settlements on these riverbanks for thousands of years. One of the best places to appreciate that antiquity is Figueira de Castelo Rodrigo. This hilltop town features the ruins of Rodrigo Castle, built in the 1200s, and commands panoramic views of the surrounding valley. Utilise local knowledge

Throughout the Douro Delights tour you’ll enjoy the services of APT’s expert Tour and Cruise Directors, as well as gain knowledge from local, bilingual guides who will lead you through their specific towns. This is the ideal way to appreciate the history and culture of a few countries that may not be that familiar, but which are truly fascinating and welcoming destinations.

This article produced in association with APT.

Be inspired by the Mediterranean’s irresistible culture – from its rich history to its vibrant countryside, everything is taken care of on a luxury APT river cruise.

For more information visit http://www.aptouring苏州夜总会招聘.au/trips/europe/eupdclm14 or contact your travel agent.

Residents can expect smoke over the weekend

14/08/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

UPDATE Sunday 4pm
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Firefighters hope to have all three fires in the Dungog area contained by Tuesday.

On Sunday afternoon the Main Creek fire was contained, while the Chichester fire had almost been contained.

Crews were still working to gain the upper hand on the Chichester Dam fire, and hoped to have it controlled by the end of Tuesday.

Residents can expect to see a lot of smoke around Chichester Dam on Sunday and Monday as crews conduct back burn operations.

Earlier report

Firefighters are currently battling threefires in the Dungog area.

The Rural Fire Service has advised the Main Creek Fire is now contained and will be patrolled from the air over the weekend.

At Chichester Dam, a fireis burning north of the dam area in steep remote country.

In Upper Chichester a fire is burning in remote steep country in the area south of Gold Diggers Gully.

Over the weekend, fire fighters will work on the fire ground and will be supported by air resources.

Smoke will be visible over the weekend from these fires.

The fire is being managed by the Incident Management Team located at the Lower Hunter Fire Control office at East Maitland.

This office will be open over the long weekend and can be reached on 4015 0000 between 0800 and 2000 hours.

Information in regards to fires in the area, fire danger ratings and total fire bans is available from 1800 NSWRFS (1800 679 737),NSW Rural Fire Service website and the Fires Near Me app.

A staging area will be established at Bendolba Rural Fire Brigade Station on Salisbury Rd, Salisbury.

There are currently no road closures.

There is a Park fire ban for the Barrington Tops National Park issued by NPWS.

Gas and electric barbecues and cookers are permitted with conditions.

More information on this is available from National Parks.

There is also a solid fuel ban issued by Forestry Corporation for State Forests in the Barrington area including Chichester and Masseys Creek State Forests.

This Sunday October 1 sees the start of the Bush Fire Danger period. From this date, a fire permit is required for burning activities. Permits have currently been suspended due to predicted weather conditions.

Fire Permits are not required for fires for the purpose of cooking food, provided that:

* the fire is in a permanently constructed fireplace;

* at a site surrounded by ground that is cleared of all combustible materials for a distance of at least two metres all around;

*the fire is completely extinguished before leaving.

Novelist Richard Flanagan and his latest project, First Person

14/08/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Modest: author Richard Flanagan. Picture: Simon SchluterWinning the most prestigious award in literature, the annual Man Booker Prize, has often provoked a period of controversy for the successful contestant.
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Not long after taking home the Booker for his 1988 novel Oscar & Lucinda, Peter Carey had his car fire bombed after writing an opinion piece that criticised white supremicism in .

In the months that followed Eleanor Catton winning her prize in 2013, she was widely condemned in her native New Zealand for claiming that her government was shallow, profit obsessed and money hungry.

A year later a humble but brilliantly imaginative novelist from Tasmania won his first Man Booker Prize. Accepting the award for The Narrow Road to the Deep North, the Oxford-educated Richard Flanagan, from a tiny west coast mining town, announced that the then Prime Minister’s commitment to coal made him ashamed to be an n.

In the years that followed that infamous ceremony, Flanagan has been busy examining a very different sort of shame and controversy. His new novel First Person tells the story of Kif Kehlmann, a struggling writer suddenly called upon to ghost write the memoirs of the mysterious and cunning white collar criminal, Siegfried Heidl. Intellectually seduced by the manipulative wits of Heidl and chasing the quick fix of a much-needed paycheque, Kehlmann attempts to reconcile his conscience with the financial responsibilities he owes to his young family.

The story draws heavily upon the author’s own experience as an ambitious young novelist in Hobart and the task he once undertook, in a similarly desperate position to Kehlmann, to write the story of the millionaire fraudster John Friedrich.

Long before his Booker triumph, Flanagan was himself a penniless writer with a monthly mortgage that his literary ambitions alone could barely sustain.

“When I was first starting out I never had a Plan B,” admits Flanagan. “For me, there never was an escape plan because I knew that a writer was all I was ever going to be and yet it is a very hard way to make a living.”

As Kif in the novel ponders his own escape from the deceitful and conniving Heidl, Flanagan contrasts the familial warmths of Kehlmann’s native Tasmania with the bleak and dreary bitumens of a drizzly inner Melbourne. Unlike his earlier and most evocative novels, First Person sets it lens onto a hostile and inhospitable city that the con man Heidl personifies with a mesmerising veracity.

By the time Kif Kehlmann makes it back to his family, the emotional home that he leaves behind at the beginning of the novel has itself become a strange and unwelcoming place.

When Flanagan reflects on this depiction of Hobart and his earlier illustrations of his home state as a whole, he can easily appreciate how the Tasmania in his own literature has remained something of a mystery.

“I used to write about the place because I found it fascinating” he says. “I still write about it because I am yet to understand it. This is true even though as a person I have been so much shaped by it.”

In Conversation with Richard Flanagan on Tuesday, Oct 3, features Flanagan talking withNewcastle Writers Festival director Rosemarie Milsom about his writing life and his new novelFirst Person. The event is at Nex, Wests City, corner of King andUnion streets, Newcastle West. Tickets $15 (Eventbrite).The Herald, Newcastle

Geoffrey Michael Strong jailed for assault causing death of Glenn Canning at Crawfords Freightlines at Sandgate

14/08/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Geoffrey StrongA TRUCK driver who punched a co-worker to death after the pair argued over a minor accident in the yard of a Sandgate freight company has been jailed for a maximum of six years, becoming the firstman to be sentenced undera variation of the state’s new “one punch” laws.
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Geoffrey Michael Strong, 46, appeared in Newcastle District Court on Friday where Judge Roy Ellis sentenced him to a non-parole period of three years and six months for causing the death of Glenn Canning, 45, at Crawford Freightlines on August 4, 2015.

The catalyst for the fatal assault was a minor crash between Strong’s truck and Mr Canning’s forklift in the yardabout 2.40pm, according to an agreed statement of facts.

A short time later, the pair argued and traded obscenities before Strong walked around the front of his prime mover to where Mr Canning was still sitting in his forklift.

He reached up and punched Mr Canning four times in the head.

Mr Canning slumped forward in the seat and was pronounced dead before paramedics could get him to hospital.

Strong was initially charged with manslaughter, but pleaded guilty to the alternative charge of assault causing death on the first day of trial.

The offence falls under the state’s new “one-punch” laws, passed in 2014 after several high-profile “coward punch” cases in Sydney, and carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in jail.

The offence was created to deter alcohol-fuelled violence, however it included a provision featuring the same criminal elementsbut without the aggravating feature of the offender being intoxicated.

“As best as I was able to ascertain there have been no prior sentences in NSW under [that section],” Crown prosecutor Brendan Queenan told Judge Ellis.

The court heard two emotional victim impact statements, including one fromMr Canning’s daughter, Renee, who outlined the huge hole his sudden death had left in their family.

Strong’s barrister, David Price,submitted his client was subject to “extra-curial punishment”, citing a “letter of demand” from WorkCover NSW who are seeking to recover from Strong a large insurance payout made to Mr Canning’s family.

Judge Ellis ordered Strong be eligible for parole on March 28, 2021.

Seven’s Cannonball misfires, sinks (almost) without trace

14/08/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Seven has been forced to reposition its latest ratings weapon after Cannonball misfired badly on debut.
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The new game show, which seems to be based on the fundamentally flawed premise that water theme parks are intrinsically hilarious, premiered at 7.30pm on Wednesday night to a decidedly soggy audience of just 513,000 viewers in the five mainland capital cities.

The show that aired immediately before it, Home & Away, was watched by 716,000 people, meaning just over 200,000 turned off just when Seven would have been hoping they would dive into this new, exciting and, well, empty-headed local version of a Dutch show.

That result dragged Seven’s main-channel share of the metro free-to-air audience down to just 16.6 per cent on Wednesday night, well behind Nine’s 23.1 per cent share.

The response was swift. The second episode had been scheduled to air at 7.30pm on Thursday night, but was instead quietly sent to the kiddie pool of late-night television, 10.45pm on Friday.

Two more episodes are slated for next week – again at 7.30pm on Wednesday and Thursday – but Seven’s lifeguards have already ordered this troubled and troublesome production, which was first announced by Seven as “coming soon” back in April 2016, out of the water altogether.

Next week’s episodes will be the last.

Does that mean Cannonball has sunk?

A spokesman for the network says not. “The show was always a four-episode run,” he said.

Cannonball’s brief volley isn’t the only misfire Seven has had to endure lately. The high-profile Hell’s Kitchen , with Marco Pierre White teaching a team of second-string celebrities how to cook, was also a ratings and critical dud.

Facebook: karlquinnjournalist Twitter: @karlkwin Podcast: The Clappers

Nokia 3310 throwback phone is officially coming to China

13/07/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

A new version of the Nokia 3310 is coming to . A new version of the classic Nokia 3310 mobile phone will launch in in October, complete with a customisable retro interface, an MP3 player and of course a version of the classic mobile game Snake.
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The homage to the legendary early-2000s brick phone wasoriginally announced early this yearby HMD Global, the Finnish company behind therecent spate of Nokia-branded phones, but its 2G GSM connectivity made it ill-suited for countries like that had begun decommissioning older mobile infrastructure.

At an event in Sydney on Thursday, HMD revealed that the throwback feature phone had been fitted with 3G capabilities for , and will launch in mid-October for $89.95.

The 3G 3310 looks a lot like the original from the early 2000s, but with a more modern screen.

“Our reimagining of the Nokia 3310 has been a global and cultural phenomenon”, said HMD’s chief product officer Juho Sarvikas in a release.

“In a world dominated by smartphones, the mix of nostalgia and a beautiful phone that just keeps going has captured people’s imagination.

:”Our fans around the world have been asking for this iconic phone to support 3G. Fans asked, we listened, and today welcome the Nokia 3310 3G”.

The phone features a 1200mAh battery that HMD says will let it last for 27 days in standby,6.5 hours of continuous phone calls or around 40 hours of MP3 playback.

It also has a 2.4-inch colour screen beneath a curved window for better visibility in sunlight, a 2MP camera, an LED torch, FM radio, Bluetoothand support for microSD cards up to 32GB.

The move to 3G means the phone doesn’t quite have the longevityof the 2G version HMD announced in February, which could last for 22 hours of talk time, but the upside will be better connectivity.

Now that it doesn’t have to rely on ancient internet services like GPRS and EDGE, the 3310 3G should offer a basic but competent internet browsing experience through its built-in Opera Mini app.

The resurrected 3310 looks like it will be perfect as a second phone to take to festivals or other players that can be dangerous for a $1000 slab of glass and aluminium.

It will also no doubt find a home with those who prefer texting with a numerical pad toswiping around touchscreens. However it remains to be seen whether the new 3310, likeitsnear-unbreakable namesake, is built towithstanda decade and a half of punishment and keep working.

Newcastle Jets fans waiting for proof after promising pre-season

13/07/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Jets fans waiting for proof SUPPORT: Jets fans at a home game against Melbourne City in December 2015. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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TweetFacebook Jets fansThe Newcastle Jets appear in a better position on and off the park than they were 12 months ago, but some of the club’s fans are waiting for proof before committing to season tickets.

Chief executive Lawrie McKinna said on Friday that the club wason track to have a similar number of members as last season.

The Jets had 8703 members last season, the sixth most in the league, when they finished with the wooden spoon. They had9266 in 2015-16and 10,003 the year before.

The clubhad sold 7181 2017-18 memberships by Friday afternoon, eight days before kicking off the season against derby rivals Central Coast at Gosford.

“It’s definitely picked up, the season coming closer. There’s a lot more members coming in picking up stuff,” McKinna said.

“The TV and radio campaign’s out there as well.

“I would say after the first game, if you go away and get that first victory, you’re going to get another pick-up as well.

“It will be similar numbers [to last year]. I don’t think it will be any more.

“A lot of members who haven’t been members for quite a few years have joined, which is quite refreshing.”

Newcastle have trial wins over champions Sydney FC, Melbourne City and Wellington under their belts, but coach Ernie Merrick has stressed that pre-season form counts for little.

McKinna said the club was more stable than it was a year ago, when owner Martin Lee took over in June then sacked coach Scott Miller in early September.

“Last year obviously we’d taken over the club and then the Scott Miller situation happened maybe a month out from the season, and that just backed up, and everyone said, ‘Oh, here we go again.’

“This season, touch wood, on the park has been good, off the park has been good.

“Sponsorship-wise we’re tracking OK, membership we’re tracking OK.

“We’ve invested more in the squad,brought in a real marquee player. So things are going along a lot more settled than it was last pre-season.”

Fans will get their first look at marquee midfielder Ronald Vargas in action when he takes part in an intraclub trial game as part of the club’s member season launch at McDonald Jones Stadium on Saturday morning.

The launch starts at 9am, and the A-League squad will take to the pitch from about 10.30for a game refereed by Merrick.

The Jets have one vacancy on their roster for a Chinese import, but McKinna said that spot was likely to be filled by a young Chinese development player.

“If we can’t get the right kind of player, we might get a youngplayer. He’ll be part of the squad, he’ll be on a full contract, but he’ll be here to learn, to get better.

“He wouldn’t be expected to play in the first team.”

Expressions of interest open for former Newcastle Post Office

13/07/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Ailing icon is up for grabs SITTING IDLE: The former Newcastle Post Office building was once the city’s crowning glory but has become an eyesore on the streetscape.
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TweetFacebook The heritage-list former Newcastle Post OfficeThe heritage-list former Newcastle Post Office is open to expressions of interestThe next chapter for one of the city’s most historic sitescould finally be about to be written after expressions of interest for the former Newcastle Post Office were opened on Friday.

However, there appears to be many hoops togo through before the city’s once crowning glory is handed a lifeline.

Colliers International Newcastle are marketing the landmark building, with expressions of interest closing November 16.

Built in 1903, the heritage-listed building at 98-100 Hunter Street is now a decayingeyesore and hopes of restoration havehad many false dawns .

But Adam Leacy, of Colliers International, believed“now is theright time” and said expressions of interest were the first step in what he hoped would see“a positive outcome”.

“The expressions of interest process is a call for proposals, for people to come to us and tell us what they have in mind –whether they want to buy it outright, whether they’d like to do a joint venture,” Mr Leacy said.

The propertyis an asset of the Awabakal Local Aboriginal Land Council, which was put into administration by the NSW government last October. That administration period ends on October 12.

Administrator Terry Lawler and Awabakal Local Aboriginal Land Council chief executive officer RobRussell will liaisewith Colliers International, then take any proposals deemed appropriate to the land council.

“It belongs to the land council and the members were approached before Christmas about what to do with it and they voted to seek expressions of interest, regarding either a sale or development, to see what the market would bring,” Mr Russell said. “The power of the land council remains with members and, ultimately whatever proposal is given to us, if the members don’t vote, it won’t go ahead.”

A spokesperson from the office of Sarah Mitchell, the NSWMinister for Aboriginal Affairs, said “asale of an asset owned by a land council can proceed under an administrator, but any decision will have to be agreed to by the land council’s members”.

How to know whether to sell before buying your new home

13/07/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

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Deciding whether to sell your current home or buy a new home first is the eternal real estate question. It’s similar to which came first, the chicken or the egg? There is no defining answer. When it comes to property, your best bet is to be as strategic as possible.

It is a stressful time when it comes to selling your biggest asset and moving to new pastures. For any move on the property ladder, whether upsizing or downsizing, the aim is for the process to be smooth.

In a perfect world, the buying and selling aspects would be as close together as possible. But, like anything, the perfect scenario is hard to create.

Ultimately, it depends on whether it is a buyer’s or seller’s market. Ideally the two transactions would occur in the same property cycle.

Rewind a couple of years. In the June quarter of 2015, Sydney’s median house price gained 8.4 per cent, according to Domain data. Since then, the level of growth has slowed, increasing 1.6 per cent in the June quarter of 2017.

This highlights the importance of understanding the market before embarking on your property journey.

In a market swayed towards the buyer, selling your home first is advisable. With no immediate urgency to sell, it can mean you are able to hold out for the best price achievable. Selling first means you know your buying budget for your next home.

You want to avoid forking out interest payments on two loans. It could see the equity you have built start to dwindle. If you do find your dream home before selling, consider leasing one of the homes. Related: Buyer’s agent a major advantageRelated: Considering buying off the plan? Related: Should your home have sold already?

These two words can often horrify homeowners: bridging finance. If you buy before selling, bridging finance can cover the period in which you own two homes. This type of finance can help in a sticky situation, but can be costly and is only for the short term. For some, bridging finance brings far too much stress.

In a seller’s market, it is assumed you should be able to quickly sell, as properties tend to move off the market quickly. Under this market dynamic, buying a home first should be less risky. When, and for how much your home will sell is an unknown. It may place unnecessary pressure on you to accept the first offer without maximising the price.

Whether it is a buyer’s or seller’s market, consider opting for a longer settlement, either for your current home or your new purchase, to allow time to find a new home or sell the old one. Make a choice that suits your personal situation so that the process can be as stress-free as possible.

Dr Nicola Powell is a data scientist at Domain Group. Tweet your questions to @DocNicolaPowell.

‘Contrite’ Nigel Hadgkiss ordered to pay $8500 penalty

13/07/2019 | 苏州夜网 | Permalink

Former building industry watchdog Nigel Hadgkiss has been ordered to pay $8500 for breaching the Fair Work Act.
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In her judgement, Federal Court judge Berna Collier took into consideration Mr Hadgkiss’ contrition and remorse and the fact he had no record of previous contraventions of the Fair Work Act. She also noted that Mr Hadgkiss “has paid a high personal price in the loss of his position as a result of his contravention”.

The Federal Court found Mr Hadgkiss contravened the Fair Work Act by instructing staff not to publish legal changes to right-of-entry rules for unions. He made the admission as a result of legal action brought by the commission’s chief target, the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union.

It was an embarrassing development for the Turnbull government, which used the ABCC as the catalyst for last year’s double-dissolution election.

Justice Collier said Mr Hadgkiss’ conduct exhibited “a degree of carelessness and, indeed, somewhat arrogant ignorance in respect of the truth of information concerning the right of entry of industry participants in an often charged industrial environment”.

She said the “careless conduct” resulted in incorrect information remaining on the agency’s website for several years, “in apparent disregard of the reputational risk” to the agency.

Mr Hadgkiss’ conduct was “at the higher end of the scale of seriousness” in terms of breaching section 503 of the Fair Work Act, she said.

“Taking into consideration the factors I have mentioned, I consider that there is utility in a pecuniary penalty order,” Justice Collier said. “The penalty should, however, also reflect the circumstances of remorse, extra-curial consequences to the director, his co-operation and his record.”

Mr Hadgkiss resigned from his $426,000 job earlier this month after admitting to breaching workplace laws during his tenure as head of the Fair Work Commission’s building industry office. After a two-week transition he officially left the job on Wednesday.

“It brings to an end a 48-year career in law enforcement,” he said in an internal memo. “In no way do I regret any of that time, challenging though much of that journey has been.”

Labor has called for an independent inquiry and has taken aim at Employment Minister Michaelia Cash for putting Mr Hadgkiss in charge of the ABCC last year even though he was at that point already under a legal cloud.

n Council of Trade Unions president Ged Kearney said the fine was “completely inadequate”.”Hadgkiss was a political appointment, tasked with enforcing authoritarian laws, that made work sites more dangerous, despite it not being clear that he had read or understood them,” she said.”The [Employment Minister Michaelia Cash] should resign and stop playing political games with working people’s lives.”

A spokesman for Senator Cash said the government respected the court’s decision.

“The decision by Mr Hadgkiss to resign his position stands in stark contrast to the many CFMEU officials who remain despite numerous court findings against them,” the spokesman said.

The government is now searching for a replacement for Mr Hadgkiss but has appointed Deputy Commissioner Cathy Cato to act in the role. Ms Cato is a lawyer from Victoria who began her career with the n Government Solicitor.